Choosing a Player Infornmation Spread Betting with a Bookmaker

If a punter thinks the player will finish in a better position than the bookmaker has predicted and bets five pounds or dollars a place, if the golfer finishes ten spots higher than the ‘spread’ the punter earns fifty dollars or pounds. Great if you win but it can be costly if your golfer has a bad tournament, or worse, chucks the towel in.

It is essential when spread betting on a pro to finish higher than the bookmakers prediction to back a pro that never gives up and tries on every shot. Even if the bet loses, the harder a player scraps for every position, the less money it will cost a punter. Information on a players character when spread betting on golf is important and any magazine article that give an insight into their on course ethos is important.

How hard a player tries is sometimes revealed by how many cuts they miss when not in contention, a fact that can be found in the players score card history, or by reading the players biography, which can be found on the European Tour or PGA Tour Web sites.

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Badminton Success Requires A System

Badminton Success Requires A System

In Denmark there are less than 6 million people, and yet we have produced 10 World Champions. Only China (1.3 billion people) and Indonesia (230 million people) have produced more. How can Denmark compete when we have so few people? We’re obsessed with quality over quantity.

I’m not saying that the Chinese and Indonesians don’t focus on quality, far from it. They are producing excellent players, with fantastic technique. However, because we have far fewer players to choose from in Denmark, and much less time to dedicate to training, we have to be sure that we are focusing on quality.

In order to produce high quality results we have to start by focusing on technique. Improving your technique takes time, and lots of practice, but with the right instruction I believe that you can see massive improvements in your technique.

In this video we interview Kaveh Mehrabi, Iran’s first Olympian in badminton. He chose to move to Denmark because it was the best place for him to go to bring him to the next level, and without doing so he would not be an Olympian today.

Playing badminton is a great deal of fun, but let’s be honest with ourselves, winning makes it that much more fun. But to win you need to be good, and to be good generally takes practice. However, simply working hard is not going to cut it, you have to work smart too. You have get serious about your training if you want to see drastic results. You have to be organized, and your training needs to have structure.

The difference between those who reach their potential and those who don’t is in the systems they develop to improve upon themselves and their discipline in executing those systems.

Great coaches understand this concept, and will do whatever they can to put their players into a system that will develop their skills and physical abilities even further.

If you don’t have access to a great coach who can develop a training system for you, then you’ll have to study on your own. It is doable though, so long as you understand it is all about having a system that you follow religiously. That’s not to say that your playing and training system cannot grow, and cannot be flexible to new situations. You need adaptation, and improvisation, but it is easier to do so when you have the foundation of a strong system supporting you.

It’s not about what you can do once, but what you repeatedly do that defines who you are. If being a great badminton player is who you want to be, you need to develop the habits of a great player. It’s all about routine, what you do regularly.…

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The Chinese Threat

The Chinese Threat

The 2009 world champion Chen Jin as well as the new star of Chinese badminton, Chen Long are just the tip of a massive Chinese threat going into any major tournament in 2012. With 5 Chinese players inside the top 16, there is a massive internal battle within the Chinese squad to claim one of a potential three spots in the Olympics, should China manage to get three players inside the top 4 in the world.

Chen Long is clearly the new star of Chinese badminton, the 22-year old begun this year well outside of the top 10 and his stunning loss to Kevin Cordon in the opening round of the world championships could have derailed his promising career. However, he returned to form later in the year with a trio of titles including a Super Series Premier title in China before his milestone victory over Lee Chong Wei in Japan the next week. This became a recurring theme, with another victory over Lee Chong Wei in Denmark and then finally in their most recent matchup in the Super Series Finals. He is the main threat to the top two in the world going into 2012.

Chen Jin claimed just a single title this year, in the Singapore Super Series after a Lin Dan walkover in the final and without Lee Chong Wei even in the draw. 30

Du Pengyu and Wang Zhengming are the two wild cards of Chinese badminton. They have all but been eliminated from being able to qualify for the 2012 games but will be vital in ensuring a massive Chinese presence at the London Olympics. Ranked #10 and #14 in the world will put them in a position of being seeds in some events but potentially facing one of the seeds in the Premier events of 2011, like Wang Zhengming taking on Taufik Hidayat in the French Super Series in October. They will also play a role in ensuring Chinese success at these events, with the Chinese squad allowing walkovers to occur in all-Chinese matchups, meaning more rest for the higher ranked Chinese players in their big events.…

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The European Hopefuls

The European Hopefuls

Pablo Abian, Rajiv Ouseph have been the powerhouses of the EBU circuit, whilst Jan O Jorgensen has been reaching the latter stages of the Super Series towards the end of 2011 after a health scare during the week of the Denmark Open.

Pablo Abian started 2011 just inside the top 50 in the world before taking four titles in the first half of the year, including a victory over Viktor Axelsen in Sweden in January to claim his first title. Opening round defeats in the Denmark and France Open will have to be improved on in 2012 to break into the world’s elite.

Rajiv Ouseph will go to the London Olympics as GB’s only chance of a medal in this event but his success in 2011 has came in Europe, with victories in Ireland and Scotland, choosing to play the European events instead of the Super Series Premier event in China. He goes into 2012 in need of a notable run in a Super Series to boost his confidence ahead of the pressure of performing on home soil after a poor attempt this year in a 21-8, 21-18 defeat to Peter Gade in the opening round of the 2011 world championships.

Jan O Jorgensen is a former top 10 player whose health scare in Denmark forced him into a layoff of 4 weeks that seen him dip to 19 in the rankings. Three quarter final appearances in Super Series events in 2011 will be the very minimum he will need to ensure his place at the Olympics ahead of Viktor Axelsen, as the two battle it out to be Denmark’s number 1 after Gade’s retirement.

However, Hans-Kristian Vittinghus is also a contender in the debate. Ranked outside the top 30 at the start of 2011, the Dane took the Dutch Open title in April to push him into the top 25 and another victory in the Bitburger Open sees him inside the top 20 and finished the year with a close match with Chen Long of China. The performance in the China Open will be one that Vittinghus hopes to emulate throughout 2011 to ensure his name is in the discussion over Denmark’s top men’s singles player.…

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The End Of An Era

The End Of An Era

Regardless of the results in London, Lee Chong Wei and Peter Gade have confirmed their intentions to retire after the Olympics. Lin Dan and Taufik Hidayat likely to follow suit, especially should Lin Dan claim his second Olympic title. Hidayat’s dip in form will likely be a contributing factor especially with his place in London far from guaranteed.

2012 will provide us with the end of an era and the chance to crown a new world number 1 after the Olympics. Whether that is Lee Chong Wei winning gold for Malaysia, Lin Dan retaining his Olympic title or the dream finale to Peter Gade’s stunning career, the countdown has begun. There is no more putting off talking about the likely retirement of these four players, for it is now a matter of months, not years now.

The 2012 season starts in just a few weeks, with the Korean Open Super Series Premier being moved 3 weeks to the first week in January, with the Malaysian Open Super Series the next week to ensure an exciting start to the year. The doubleheader of the Indonesia Premier and Singapore Super Series will be the final event before the run-in to the Olympics in late July.

Then, another 6 week break before the China Masters and the first opportunity to survey the aftermath of the 2012 Olympics. The year ends with the China Open Premier and the Hong Kong Super Series in late November to conclude what is likely to be a historic year of badminton.…

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What Separates The Best From The Rest: Professionalism

What Separates The Best From The Rest: Professionalism

Doctor, dentist, lawyer, accountant, engineer… What do Lin Dan, Peter Gade and Lee Chong Wei have in common with these people? They’re all professionals. While these players haven’t gone to school to study badminton like a doctor went to medical school, they do take their sport very seriously. I can assure you that Peter Gade looks at badminton as his job, and has done so since he was 18 or 19 years old. This could very well be the number one most important thing that separates someone like Peter Gade, from some national level player.

How does someone treat badminton professionally? Here are a few things to consider:

-Missing practice is not an option
-Plan your tournament schedule with purpose
-Collaborate with others that are professionals in areas you need help (trainers, physiotherapy, nutrition etc)
-Train multiple times a day (two on court sessions, and one off court session typically)
-Cut back on the partying (like to go out for junk food, or drinks with friends?? not anymore)

Basically it boils down to discipline. If you expect to be a professional badminton player, you need to be a professional. For another analogy, I would look at yourself as a business. Your business is to become a great badminton player, and hopefully start winning money, and getting sponsors, and of course winning for all that glory and personal satisfaction. However, you can’t be knowledgeable about everything that you need to do. This is where you need to start collaborating with other professionals. Get lessons with an excellent coach. Have a professional trainer make up a training program for you after telling them what your fitness and strength goals are. Speak with a nutritionist about developing an athletic diet so you can make sure that you are putting the right kind of fuel into your body. This is the reason why the same countries succeed in badminton consistently. It’s not necessarily because they have more talent, or badminton specific knowledge. It’s because they have the support structures in place to help their athletes focus on what they do best, play badminton. Leave the other stuff to other professionals.

This is very difficult if you are doing it all on your own. It can be expensive to work with a trainer everyday. The same goes for a nutritionist. But you could just get them to give you a monthly program, then next month get another one done. If you’re serious about succeeding in badminton you will need to invest time and unfortunately some money into developing yourself as a player, talent can’t solve everything.

Here at BVM we are working on providing some tools for aspiring players to help them cut back on the costs of developing quality training programs, and hopefully these tools will help players that don’t have government funding to be able to excel without spending hundreds of dollars every month on trainers and private lessons. There is of course no substitute for in person coaching, but having a world champion as a mentor will certainly help.

For more information on our training program visit BadmintonLife.com…

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Yonex Open Japan Super Series 2009: Zhou Mi Out

Yonex Open Japan Super Series 2009: Zhou Mi Out

The draw in Japan left a real chance of seeds falling today, with potential shocks with Boonsak Ponsana against Lee Chong Wei in Round 1 being one of the matches of the day. Ponsana came into the event on the back of his Super Series Final defeat to Lin Dan and the Thai player was expected to trouble the world number 1.

That was simply not the case. Lee Chong Wei sailed into Round 2 with a 21-9, 21-15 victory. Joachim Persson, seeded 7 played Shon Wan Ho of Korea, a player showing promise in recent weeks. The Korean player took a set of Peter Gade just last week in the China Masters and continues his excellent form with a superb 21-13, 21-13 over Persson. He plays Bao Chunlai in Round 2.

The bottom half of the men’s draw has been decimating with Chen Jin’s withdrawal and Joachim Persson’s defeat, leaving just two seeds in the bottom half of the draw going into Round 2. The Women’s draw is none the better, with Wang Yihan the last seed left in the top half of the Women’s draw.

Zhou Mi’s half of the draw was a potentially easier one that she expected, the withdrawal of world champion Lu Lan and Xie Xingfang meant that only herself and Wang Yihan were seeded in the top half. Adriyanti Firdasari was her Round 1 opponent, three sets and 56 minutes later, the top seed tumbled out of the competition. Zhou Mi held a 16-12 lead in the third set, only to lose nine of the next eleven points. Half of the seeds in the Women’s singles are now out or withdrew pre-event. Salna Nehwal also failed to reach Round 2, with a three-set defeat against Jiang Yanjiao.

The event is littered with Chinese withdrawals, Lu Lan, Xie Xingfang, Cai and Fu, Xie Zhongbo and Zhang Yawen to name a few.

The Men’s Doubles has also suffered its fair share of shocks in Round 1. Second seeds Tan and Koo losing to Japanese partnership of Hayakawa and Kazuno. The pair was seeded 14th at the World Championships. The story of the early rounds of the World Championships was Howard Bach and Tony Gunawan’s run at world title number two.

The pair put together some incredible victories to reach the quarterfinals; they have started their campaign with another outstanding win over Paaske and Rasmussen, the 6th seeds. The American partnership was never behind in the third set and play Hoshino and Kobayashi in Round 2.…

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